What role will Tiktok play in the Australian federal election 2022?

1. see Vote Earth Now tiktok!

2. TripleJ Hack: Can TikTok memes influence an election?

Image: Getty Images/Ange McCormack, triple j

As the federal election looms next year, a new cohort of politically-engaged young people are turning Tiktok’s signature trends into some serious (and not so serious) Auspol content.

But what if the posts you’ve been seeing were paid for by the political parties themselves?

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Live guests:
Andrew Hughes, political advertising researcher at Australian National University
Zali Steggall, Independent Federal MP, and former Olympian
Kate, junior doctor from Albury
Dr Dan Wilson, Rural Doctors Association

 3. “Don’t dance, sing or stunt”: How Julian Hill became TikTok’s most popular Australian politician in Australian Politics

The honor is given to Julian Hill, a Commonwealth Labor Party member in Victoria, who has never heard of it unless he is a user of an app famous for music videos and viral dance.

At the time of writing, his video has 125,000 followers and 1.8 million likes. hill Comfortably defeat the Victorian Prime Minister, Daniel Andrews, Early Adopters of Video Sharing Social Media Apps 103,000 followers came in second.

In this format, users can post and share up to 3 minutes of video (often shorter) and reward those who can make an immediate impression.

Homemade music and dance videos, lip-sync, pantomime, and satire tend to be the most appreciated by non-political users, but attacks on Hill’s opponents have led to a surge in viewership. increase.

Hill’s most popular video to date has been viewed 1.1 million times. 3 minute clip In his speech to Parliament’s Second String Federation, he found a creative way to explain Scott Morrison’s “loose relationship with the truth.”

Hill joined the app this year thanks to a suggestion from Sam Richards, the son of a family friend who has completed his tenth year of work experience in a parliamentary office.

“I was interested [him joining] He had a lot of social media platforms, “Richards tells Guardian Australia.

“We started putting his speech and all its videos there, and it started taking off.”

Richards states that the platform is attractive because he and his friends are big users of TikTok and the algorithm is a “tailor”. [videos] What people want to see. “

Hill says he has published a “wide range of material,” from Congressional speeches to works and cameras. Sometimes the video is a big hit, and sometimes the algorithm is “mysterious.”

“You need to communicate with people where they are,” says Hill. “More and more people are involved in social media through TikTok. You have to do them with the courtesy of treating them wisely.”

Hill says his golden rule is “being real, not dancing, singing, or stunting.”

Perhaps the stunts are in the eyes of the viewer – some may categorize Call Indue and ask them to use a cashless debit card As a stunt.

Hill became like an attack dog for workers by naming Morrison a “random artist.” Joke about his plan to become a male model by 2050 Mock the simultaneous climate goals.

Hill argues that the content posted on TikTok is often the same as the content delivered through other social media. Use this content to amplify what you believe, both in Congress and outside.

Some colleagues say Hill’s tone is capable of communicating his policy beliefs about all of his online popularity, including his work on a parliamentary commission that covers everything from outsourcing and migration to funding auditors. I wonder if it could hurt.

Hill claims to be addressing TikTok’s major issues, including robodette, climate change and employment, immigration and visa issues.

He states that TikTok “has a lot of ridiculous things,” but “politics is a serious business, but it doesn’t have to be boring and attractive.”

“That is the trampling line.”

“I get great feedback when I take the time to explain policy topics and, as I see, politics about what’s happening,” Hill said.

His video about Congress sat for just 10 days in the first half of 2022, Or a coalition move to thwart investigations Disclosure of Christian Porter Donations Both are in that vein.

Richards says many of his friends are currently following Hill, but Hill claims it’s not just a medium for young people.

“I had a woman in her 70s who sent me a message. [electoral boundary] Redistribute. She said, “I’m following you on TikTok, so I’m glad I’m in your voters.”

“I received a lot of emails from [parents] Thank you for getting your children involved in politics, current affairs and ideas.

“I was hit by something from TikTok and stopped by people who wanted to talk to me on the streets, restaurants and shops. To meet them where they were and explain something. Because it took time. “

Hill’s success has swarmed other MPs on the platform, including the Minister of Education Shadow. Tannya Privask.. Some of his colleagues are already stars on his channel.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese I recently joined TikTok, But highly valued in Hill’s account Call Peter Dutton a sick person The time in question.

Opposition business manager Tony Burke also praised comments that attacked the government. Covid-19 vaccination and quarantine..

Richards says far more MPs have joined TikTok since Hill, but “no one has surpassed Julian yet.”

“I hope he stays in that top position. I want to see it … Of course, it’s still really working with the numbers – it’s exciting to see.

“It was a great experience. It was part of what went well and the experience that helped Julian was really exciting to me.”

“Don’t dance, sing or stunt”: How Julian Hill became TikTok’s most popular Australian politician | Australian Politics

Source link “Don’t dance, sing or stunt”: How Julian Hill became TikTok’s most popular Australian politician | Australian Politics

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